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Parasailing

What Is Parasailing

Parasailing, also known as parascending or parakiting, is a recreational kiting activity where a person is towed behind a vehicle (usually a boat) while attached to a specially designed canopy wing that reminds one of a parachute, known as a parasail wing. The manned kite’s moving anchor may be a car, truck, or boat. The harness attaches the pilot to the parasail, which is connected to the boat, or land vehicle, by the tow rope. The vehicle then drives off, carrying the parascender (or wing) and person into the air. If the boat is powerful enough, two or three people can parasail behind it at the same time. The parascender has little or no control over the parachute. The activity is primarily a fun ride, not to be confused with the sport of paragliding.

There are commercial parasailing operations all over the world. Land-based parasailing has also been transformed into a competition sport in Europe. In land-based competition parasailing, the parasail is towed to maximum height behind a 4-wheel drive vehicle. The driver then releases the tow line; the parasailer flies down to a target area in an accuracy competition. The sport was developed in the early 80’s and has been very popular ever since. The first international competitions were held in the mid 80’s and continue to this day.

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When Did Its Start

The first ascending-gliding parachute was developed by Pierre-Marcel Lemoigne in 1962.  The same year, Lemoigne established an Aeronautical Training Center to introduce his new ascending-gliding parachute as a training tool for parachutists. The technique allows parachutists to train more efficiently by towing the parachutist to a suitable altitude, then releasing them to practice landings. This training method proved cheaper than—and just as effective as—an airplane. In 1963 Jacques-André Istel from Pioneer Parachute Company bought a license from Lemoigne to manufacture and sell the 24-gore ascending-gliding parachute which was trade-named “parasail.”

In 1974, Mark McCulloh invented the first self-contained parasail launch and recovery vessel that incorporated a hydraulic winch and canopy assist mast that collectively launched and retrieved the parasail canopy and parasailors to and from the vessel flight deck. McCulloh’s invention was patented in 1976 and later referred to as a “WINCHBOAT” which the set the first parasail equipment industry standard that is utilized by all commercial parasail operations around the world.

In early 1976, Brian Gaskin designed, created, and tested the first 16-gore canopy design which he named “Waterbird”. The Waterbird was revolutionary in its canopy design, its unique tow yoke harness arrangement, its construction, and the use of zero porosity fabrics which allowed it to be used over water safely. The majority of commercial parasail operators then moved to the 16-gore canopy arrangement. In 1976 Gaskin founded his company, Waterbird Parakites, which is still in operation today, producing commercial and recreational 16-gore parasails.

In April 2013, the first ASTM parasail weather standard was approved. With the help of the WSIA, and the chair of the parasail committee, Matthew Dvorak, owner and operator of Daytona Beach Parasail, Inc. the new standard was implemented. This is the first standard in the parasail industry with three more in the works to be approved later this year. This standard was the first step in bringing the otherwise unregulated industry into a more uniformed and safe industry!

Where We Can Make You Do This

  • Parasailing at Jaisalmer
  • Water Sports in Mobor, Goa
  • Adventurous Water Sports in Goa
  • Solo and Tandem Parasailing at Jakkur Airfield
  • Winch-boat Parasailing at Mobor Beach in South Goa
  • Adventure Water Sports in Goa
  • Parasailing at Nagaon Beach in Alibaug
  • Water Sports Activities at Coco Beach in North Goa
  • Island Trip with Water Sport Activities in Goa
  • Monsoon Water Sports Combo in Goa
  • Parasailing and Water Sports in Tarkarli
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